Cells: self-published literary fiction

19 thoughts on “Cells: self-published literary fiction”

  1. What a terrific review – and as a firm supporter of self published books, thank you for waving the flag.
    I must declare an interest here though – I am also published by SilverWood Books. I was dropped by Random House UK several years ago (when interest in Historical Fiction took a bit of a nose-dive) so I took my novels to a small UK indie company with an even smaller mainstream imprint. It tied me over for a while, but even with lovely staff the unprofessional attitude of the MD eventually led to the company going into liquidation, owing money left right & centre & disappointed self published authors with no books. The bankruptcy did me a favour though – I was mainstream published in the US, so decided to find myself a real, caring, UK SP company who knew what they were doing. I went to Helen Hart’s SilverWood Books.

    I am delighted that Harriet has a superb home for her novel – and I agree with you, several years ago Cells would have been picked up by mainstream as a “good read”. Thank goodness for the opportunity of self-publishing… but please make sure, if you are using a company to assist you in the process, choose one with a good reputation!

    My best wishes to Harriet – and cells.

    Like

  2. I must admit I’ve no experience of self-publishing companies. I imagine the challenge is to prove that the cost of a self-pub service will pay off in the end compared to going it alone, which I know many ‘aspiring’ authors are now doing by publishing to Kindle.
    For me, it’s interesting to weigh up the options. Making a decision might be harder!
    AliB

    Like

  3. PS AliB – in my excitement at the review, I dashed off a thank you and inserted an apostrophe where there certainly shouldn’t have been one – and me a writer!! Ha, ha…. you might think. Seriously, though… I want to comment more on your review and what it means to me. It’s great to get your comments, feedback, and recognition at what I was trying to do – write an emotionally complex book that is not predicable ‘in a good way’ and hopefully has emotional truth, It is lovely to be compared with Salley Vickers and Maggie O’Farrell, and I’m delighted that it has changed your perception of self-publishing. This book did the rounds of publishers and was nearly take by a large mainstream publisher. Now, lIke Helen Hollick I feel very lucky to be with Helen Hart at SilverWood Books, and I’m into writing my next novel.
    Harriet

    Like

  4. Thanks for the good luck… I’ll sure need it! As for Salley V… I’ve never met anyone else who spells it like that – and not being the world’s best speller it was quite a bit of luck I knew it!!
    Harriet

    Like

  5. More and more books are being reviewed as excellent reads that simply couldn’t find a home via the ‘traditonal’ publishing route, particulary in today’s tough climate. This is one of those reviews, considered and balanced. Well done, Harriet and AliB. Gets the thumbs up from me. 🙂

    Like

  6. Hi Janice, Sheryl and Kathryn- sorry I missed you earlier. The trouble is, not all self-published books are great, finding the good ones isn’t always easy. Just have to hope cream rises ot the top!
    AliB

    Like

  7. To self-publish or not to self-publish is always a different dilemma for authors now. And it’s also difficult to choose whether to read a self-published book. I’ve read excellent ones, I’ve read lousy ones and some falling in between. But I always trust your reviews, Alison, and hope Cells will encourage you to read more Independents. Always a gamble, but then again so are mainstream books.

    Like

  8. Well said, Kit – I can think of a few commercially published novels I consider turkeys- although a small minority.
    Hi Cheerfulchick – thanks for visiting. I sometimes wonder how much quality writing is due to quality editing – that’s without meaning any disrespect to the author of course. A question for another day. maybe!
    AliB

    Like

  9. A fabulous and thought-provoking review–thank you very much for bringing this to us. It sounds like this is the kind of book that will grab its audience and won’t let it go until the conclusion of the story. “Cells” sounds like an intereting and engaging read, and it’s definitely on my TBR. Regarding the whole self-publishing versus traditional route… Well, what can I say? I am biased, of course, being ‘indie’ myself, but I think previous commenters are absolutely right in saying that traditional publishers will begin to lose out–monumentally, in my opinion–as new, emerging talent decides to go independent; and reap the rewards! Congrats to Harriet, thanks to Ali, and good luck to everybody with their endeavours! XX

    Like

  10. Hi Nicki – well like every book it will be a matter of taste – and this will have a smaller market than many, but still extremely well written IMO.
    AliB

    Like

  11. Thanks everyone for their lovely comments. I agree with AliB re a good editor. I believe you have to re-write and re-write – or at least I have to; ‘Cells’ was re-written many times. And then have a good editor who doesn’t just make sure there aren’t any typos or gobbledygook sentences but has a feel for the story and can tell where it needs a tweek or a tuck, or maybe another chapter or more development in places. Those editors are like gold dust.

    Like

  12. Hi and thanks for visiting. Yes, so many new ways of doing things. Good to have choices, but making them all the more difficult!
    AliB

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s