Small but perfectly formed

5 thoughts on “Small but perfectly formed”

  1. Hmm. Interesting post, Alison. Hadn’t given much thought to the visual impact of reading fiction before.
    I’ve recently taken the plunge and bought a Kindle. I resisted for a long time, but I’m finding the experience very satisfying. The format of the books I’ve read so far are the same, although Kindle gives the option of reducing/expanding font sizes, etc.
    Reading a print book is still my preference, perhaps in no small way due to the variety of the medium.

    Tricia

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  2. That’s an interesting point. When I was involved in a Heritage Lottery funded project we produced a book and I became involved in planning meetings with the book design team. This was a whole new fascinating world to me. I’d never have considered such things as the use of white space before. I’d only ever sent off typed pages of A4 and now I was being asked to create the whole reading experience.

    I too am hoping to get a Kindle soon so I can’t comment about that yet but I guess it must be excellent for anyone with a visual disability. I don’t suppose they smell of paper. I do love the smell of paper.

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  3. Hi Tricia, Ros and Nik
    I had a brief liaison with a Sony e-reader a couple of years ago and to my surprise was instantly won over. I now lust after a Kindle (especially as most of my friends now have one!) and in general don’t feel I would miss the physical aspects of the mass market perfect-bound paperback novel (which falls apart and is not that easy to read in bed). But Nik’s short stories remind me it doesn’t have to be like this. Some books are produced with thought and care and are a pleasure to handle (as well as smell!) I’m sure they’ll continue to be produced despite the rush to e-platforms, although maybe for more limited markets.
    AliB

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  4. Thanks again Ali!

    I have a Kindle and am a fan (it’s not perfect but it is good). The ‘pages’ are smaller than the average PB but that doesn’t seem to make any difference to the reading experience, generally.

    I don’t see eReaders as replacements for physical books – it’s just a different way to enjoy them and there’s nothing wrong with that at all, I reckon.

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